cornerstones

Cornerstones is an effort to document and advocate for the overlooked and threatened landmarks of New Orleans. Through a citywide survey of residents, Cornerstones will be the first ground-up approach to identifying New Orleans’ important historical and cultural sites and it will broaden our ideas about the types of spaces that are important to our city and why they are significant to us.

Through a partnership with the Neighborhood Story Project, we have developed a publication called “Cornerstones: Celebrating the Everyday Monuments and Gathering Places of New Orleans Neighborhoods,” which features seven local landmarks. Through interviews, site mapping, architectural drawings, and photos, we illustrate the range of ways neighborhood places are important to New Orleans.


Partners

Cornerstones
Neighborhood Story Project

Project Lead

Dan Etheridge

Project Team

Tulane City Center
Helen Jeurgens, TCC intern
Art Terry, TCC intern
Seth Welty, TCC intern

Cornerstones
Bethany Rogers

Neighborhood Story Project
Rachel Breunlin



cornerstones: candlelight longue

Cornerstones is a place documentary initiative that has teamed up with Tulane City Center at Tulane’s School of Architecture on various outreach projects throughout the city. The project both documents and promotes sites that store, facilitate, or perpetuate New Orleans’ history, culture, and sense of place. Tulane City Center and Cornerstones were asked by community members of the Candlelight Lounge in the Historic Treme neighborhood to document and position the significance of the barroom within the neighborhood and greater New Orleans, so that efforts to sustain the barroom can be well supported. The Candlelight Lounge is the only longtime barroom and live music venue still open in the Historic Treme, a community celebrated for its jazz and performance culture. Cornerstones has documented other sites in New Orleans with an uncertain future, such as the Mother-In-Law Lounge after Mrs. Antoinette K-Doe passed away and the Deutsches Haus prior to the demolition of Lower Mid-City for the development of the LSU/VA biomedical complex. The Candlelight Lounge, by comparison, faces slower-moving, quieter threats.

The booklet presents a portrait of a place that has served an everyday role in the lives of Treme residents, past and present. In so doing, it has also sustained a festive spirit and a performance culture that have made the barroom a meaningful place to Candlelight community members in the neighborhood and well beyond.



Partners

Cornerstones

Project Lead

Bethany Rogers, Cornerstones

Projec Team

Cameron Ringness, TCC Intern
Sarah Satterlee, TCC Intern